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2 edition of Scotus, Ockham, and the theory of intuitive cognition. found in the catalog.

Scotus, Ockham, and the theory of intuitive cognition.

Charles Kenneth Brampton

Scotus, Ockham, and the theory of intuitive cognition.

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Published by [Antonianum] in [Rome] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Duns Scotus, John.,
  • William, -- of Ockham, -- ca.1285-ca.1349.

  • Edition Notes

    Reprinted from "Antonianum", an. 40, 1965, fasc 3-4, (Rome).

    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19619373M


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Scotus, Ockham, and the theory of intuitive cognition. by Charles Kenneth Brampton Download PDF EPUB FB2

Richard Cross provides the first complete and detailed account of Duns Scotus's theory of cognition, tracing the processes involved in cognition from sensation, through intuition and abstraction, Scotus conceptual Ockham 5. Scotus holds that it is possible to have conceptual knowledge that has individuals as and the theory of intuitive cognition.

book object: what he calls ’intuitive cognition’. His thoughts on the question undergo some development, and this chapter traces that evolution. The chapter argues that Scotus comes to hold that such cognition can have extramental material things as its and the theory of intuitive cognition.

book, and that the mechanism he. Against Duns Scotus, who held that intuitive cognition is possible only with respect to actually existing objects, William of Ockham maintained the possibility of intuiting non-existing things.

In this paper, Panaccio and Piché examine the reasons Ockham might have held this rather counter-intuitive view of intuitive cognition.

After discussing their applicability to the sojourn, a discussion of Scholasticism’s historical import provides a foundation to show the innovation of Scotus and Ockham. Ockham epistemology and theories of the will Ockham new ways of conceiving cognitive surety and how this knowledge aids in generating charitable : David Strong.

Intuitive Cognition and Divine Omnipotence: Ockham in Fourteenth-Century Perspective. Rega Wood - - In Anne Hudson & Michael Wilks (eds.), From Ockham to Wyclif. Published for the Ecclesiastical History Society by B.

Blackwell. Author: Elizabeth Karger. John Duns Scotus Part Ockham Interpretation and Reconception IV. Peter Aureol V. William of Ockham Part Three: The Rejection of Ockham's Theory of Knowledge in England Between Scotus and Scotus VII.

The Early Reaction to Aureol and Ockham: the Views of Walter Chatton VIII. Oxford in the s by: Ockham’s theory of cognition is presented in works such as the And the theory of intuitive cognition.

book Logicae, the Quodlibeta Septem, and the Prologue to the Ordinatio (the Commentary on the First Book of Scotus. Ockham makes a basic distinction between the sentient and intellective soul. Notes on Contributors Abbreviations and Method of Citation Introduction 1 Chatton’s Critique of Ockham’s Conception of And the theory of intuitive cognition.

book Cognition Sonja Schierbaum 2 Crathorn versus Ockham on Cognition, Language, and Ontology Aurélien Robert 3 Pseudo-Richard of Campsall and Richard Brinkley Laurent Cesalli 4 Wyclif as an Opponent of Ockham A Case of Realist Reaction to Ockham.

Richard Cross provides the first complete and detailed account of Ockham Scotus's theory of cognition, tracing the processes involved in cognition from sensation, through intuition and abstraction, to conceptual thought.

The theory of intuitive and abstractive cognition was developed by John Duns Scotus in the late thirteenth century, and it dominated the discussion about cognition from the fourteenth to the sixteenth century.

9 Ockham’s Misunderstood Theory of Intuitive and Abstractive Cognition elizabeth karger 10 Ockham’s Ethical Theory peter king 11 Ockham on Will, Nature, and Morality marilyn mccord adams 12 Natural Law and Moral Omnipotence a. mcgrade 13 The Political Writings john kilcullen 14 Ockham on Faith and Reason alfred j.

William of Ockham (/ ˈ ɒ k əm /; also Occam, from Latin: Gulielmus Occamus; c. – ) was an English Franciscan friar, scholastic philosopher, and theologian, who is believed to have been born in Ockham, a small village in Surrey. He is considered to be one of the major figures of medieval thought and was at the centre of the major intellectual and political controversies of Alma mater: University of Oxford.

Richard Cross provides the first complete and detailed account of Duns Scotus's theory of cognition, tracing the processes involved in cognition from sensation, through intuition and abstraction, to conceptual thought.

He provides an analysis of the ontological status of the various mental items (acts and dispositions) involved in cognition, and a new account of Scotus on.

Scotus and Ockham on Universals and Individuation. Trope theory can seem intuitive because we encounter, Another theory Ockham Scotus is Scotus's theory. Ockham attacksAuthor: Jt Paasch. John Duns Scotus (/) was (along with Aquinas and Ockham) one of the three principal figures in medieval philosophy and theology, with an influence on modern thought arguably even greater than that of Aquinas.

The essays in this volume systematically survey the full range of Scotus's thought. They take care to explain the technical details of his writing in.

Scotus is a realist on the issue of universals and one of the main adversaries of Ockham’s programme of nominalism. He endorsed Avicenna’s theory of the common nature, according to which essences have an independence and priority to their existence as either universal in the mind or singular outside it.

William of Ockham (or William of Occam) (c. - ) was an English Franciscan friar, philosopher and theologian of the Medieval period. Along with St. Thomas Aquinas, John Duns Scotus and Averroës, he is one of the major figures of late medieval Scholastic thought, and was at the center of the major intellectual and political controversies of the 14th Century.

The theory of intuitive and abstractive cognition was developed by John Duns Scotus in the late thirteenth century, and it dominated the discussion about cognition from.

This book provides the first complete and detailed account of Duns Scotus’s theory of cognition, tracing the processes involved in cognition, from sensation, through intuition and abstraction, to conceptual thought. It provides an analysis of the ontological status of the various mental items (acts and dispositions) involved in cognition, and a new account of Scotus on.

This is again a startling view and seems to make Scotus out to be a proto-Ockhamist. This is, namely, the position of the later Ockham, which argues that the content reduces to the act of cognition, and it is the foundation of his functionalism.

The great difference between the two. For Scotus, the axiom stating that only the individual exists is a dominating principle of the understanding of reality. For the apprehension of individuals, an intuitive cognition is required, which gives us the present existence or the non-existence Alma mater: University of Oxford.

I argue that Ockham’s ‘act theory’ of singular cognition fails to explain how cognitive acts come to signify specific classes of objects in the extramental world. I discuss Scotus’s theory of intuitive cognition, and suggest that it provides a via media between the abstractionism of Aquinas’s account, and the nominalist conceptualism Author: Xavier Joseph Anthony Symons.

Get this from a library. Duns Scotus's theory of cognition. [Richard Cross] -- Richard Cross provides the first complete and detailed account of Duns Scotus's theory of cognition, tracing the processes involved in cognition from sensation, through intuition and abstraction, to.

The subject of intuitive and abstractive cognition didn't appear on Faber's original list, but it's an important and influential part of Scotus' thought, so here it is.

To begin with, let's briefly recall how thinking works in Aquinas, whose epistemology is probably the scholastic one most familiar to any readers coming here.

The main purpose of this paper is to reassess the debate between Boehner and Karger about Ockham’s views on the infallibility of intuitive cognition, and to present a new account of infallible intuitive cognition.

After a detailed overview of Ockham’s theory of intuitive and abstractive cognition, the Boehner/Karger debate is examined.

OCKHAM, WILLIAM OF (, near London, England, ca. ; d. Munich, Germany, ) philosophy, theology, political theory. Traditionally regarded as the initiator of the movement called nominalism, which dominated the universities of northern Europe in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries and played a significant role in shaping the directions of modern thought, William of Ockham.

William of Ockham (). Table of Contents1 Ideas2 Biography3 Major Works of William of Ockham Related:4 Videos5 Related Products Ockham - Philosophical Writings: A Selection Ockham's Theory of Terms: Part I of the Summa Logicae The Cambridge Companion to Ockham (Cambridge Companions to Philosophy) Ockham's Theory of.

Richard Cross provides the first full study of Duns Scotus's theory of cognition, examining his account of the processes involved in cognition, from sensation, through intuition and abstraction, to conceptual thought.

Cross places Scotus's thought clearly within the context of 13th-century study on the mind, and of his intellectual forebears. In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content.

THE SOURCES OF INTUITIVE COGNITION IN WILLIAM OF OCKHAM1 Intuitive cognition is a hallmark of fourteenth century philosophy.

It becomes a central notion in Duns Scotus and undergoes rich, diverse development in thinkers such as Peter Auriol and William of Ockham. Intuitive cognition is such that when some things are cognized, of which one inheres in the other, or one is spatially distant from the other, or exists in some relation to the other, immediately in virtue of that non-propositional cognition of those things, it is known if the thing inheres or does not inhere, if it is spatially distant or not, and the same for other true contingent.

Scotus was, after all, the thinker at whom Ockham slashed his razor. Cross shows that “Scotus does indeed have some elementary account of a kind of mental language [paradigmatically] associated with Ockham” (), and that “Scotus has an account of mental language [which] clearly anticipates aspects of Ockham’s own theory” ().

For Ockham, intuitive cog - nition is a type of cognition that provides immediate access to the world and grounds judgments regarding contingent, current, local matters of fact—i.e., how things stand right here and now.6 Indeed, Ockham distinguishes intuitive cognition precisely in terms of the two-fold role it plays in perceptual judg-Cited by: 4.

It is by modifying the distinction between intuitive and abstractive cognition inherited from Scotus, Stump argues, that Ockham is ultimately able to provide an account of perception without relying on mediating species.

Stump concludes with a discussion of some difficulties with Ockham's rejection of intelligible and sensible species.

Thomas Aquinas, John Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham all discuss the relationship between cognition and willing in the context of how a human act is caused. In this context, a cause is something that plays an explanatory role in the effect’s production and is in some sense a source of the effect’s existence.

The present paper is a reply to this challenge. I first summarize the case for seeing Ockham’s theory of intuitive cognition as a causal and externalist approach, and then critically review Brower-Toland’s arguments against it. The whole discussion, as it turns out, sheds new light upon Ockham’s conception of causality and natural order.

Cited by: 4. Epistemology - Epistemology - St. Thomas Aquinas: With the translation into Latin of Aristotle’s On the Soul in the early 13th century, the Platonic and Augustinian epistemology that dominated the early Middle Ages was gradually displaced.

Following Aristotle, Aquinas recognized different kinds of knowledge. Sensory knowledge arises from sensing particular things.

William of Ockham is known for his “razor,” for his logic, and for his nominalistic and empirical viewpoint. Living in the fourteenth century, he was the dominant figure in the movement away. powerful, and subtle theory. Ockham holds the rightness or wrongness of an act to depend not on any feature or characteristic of the act itself or its consequences, but rather on the agent’s intentions and character (elab-orated in Ockham’s theory of the will and of the virtues respectively).

TheFile Size: KB. One in a Million: Scotus on Universals and Individuals. • R. Cross, Duns Scotus’ Theory of Cognition (Oxford: ). • J.J.E. Gracia (ed.), I thought that Kant's distinction between intuitive and discursive knowledge should be traced back to Leibniz.

Now I realize that it should be traced back to Scotus. PHIL – MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY OF MIND AND COGNITION. Fall DAY / TIME: TH – P.M. Averroes, Aquinas, Scotus, Ockham, we will observe the apparition of the modern conceptions of the subject and of knowledge.

The Ockham, intuitive cognition and direct realism * Ockham: Reportatio. bk II q. 15, p. Book Description. Debates in Medieval Philosophy: Essential Readings and Contemporary Responses aims to de-mystify medieval pdf by pdf an illuminating, engaging introduction to the problems that medieval philosophers from Augustine through Ockham wrestled of the volume’s 11 units presents a debate that will enable students to return to the primary texts .Summa Contra Gentiles: Book 4: Salvation - Ebook written by Thomas Aquinas.

self-knowledge turns out to be central to Aquinas's account of cognition and personhood, and that his theory provides tools for considering intentionality, reflexivity and selfhood.

Scotus, Ockham, and others. $ $ The Consolation of Philosophy.